Comparison Operators in Python with Examples|

What are Comparison Operators in Python ?

In this article, we’ll delve into the world of comparison operators, breaking down their functionalities with easy-to-understand explanations and relatable examples. we will know what are 6 comparison operators in python ? what are the 4 comparison operators in python. so keep reading the full article till last.

Comparison operators in Python are important tools or operators that allow us to compare values and determine relationships between them. comparison operators in python are also called Relational Operators in python. Comparison operators help us make decisions based on conditions and comparisons between variables.

Different Types of Comparison Operators in Python

Comparing Values with Comparison Operators

Comparison operators in Python are symbols that help us compare values for equality, inequality, and order. Python provides a set of six primary comparison operators:

  1. Equal To (==): Compares whether two values are equal.
  2. Not Equal To (!=): Compares whether two values are not equal.
  3. Greater Than (>): Checks if the first value is greater than the second.
  4. Less Than (<): Checks if the first value is less than the second.
  5. Greater Than or Equal To (>=): Checks if the first value is greater than or equal to the second.
  6. Less Than or Equal To (<=): Checks if the first value is less than or equal to the second.

Examples of Comparison Operators

Let’s dive into each comparison operator with simple and relatable examples.

The Equal To (==) Operator

The equal to operator (==) in Python is a fundamental tool for comparing two values to determine if they are equal. This operator is commonly used to assess whether two variables or expressions hold the same value. In this explanation, we’ll delve into the details of the equal to operator, exploring its functionality and providing real-world examples to enhance your understanding.

Examples of the Equal To Operator

Let’s explore the equal to operator with a series of examples to explain its usage.

Comparing Numeric Values:

a = 5
b = 5
result = a == b
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, the values of a and b are both 5, so the result of the comparison using the equal to operator is True.

Comparing Strings:

name1 = "Alice"
name2 = "Bob"
result = name1 == name2
print(result)  # Output: False

Here, the values of name1 and name2 are different (“Alice” and “Bob”), so the comparison using the equal to operator returns False.

x = 10
y = 2 * 5
result = x == y
print(result)  # Output: True

The equal to operator can also be used to compare expressions. In this example, y is an expression that evaluates to the same value as x, resulting in a comparison of True.

Conditional Statements Using Equal To Operator:

user_input = input("Enter a number: ")
if user_input == "5":
    print("You entered the number 5.")
else:
    print("You entered a different number.")

Not Equal To (!=) Operator

The “not equal to” operator (!=) is a fundamental comparison operator in Python that allows you to determine whether two values are not equal. It’s used to test if the values on the left and right sides of the operator are different. The result of the comparison is a boolean value: True if the values are not equal, and False if they are equal. In this explanation, we’ll delve into the details of the “not equal to” operator, providing clear explanations and relatable examples.

Using the Not Equal To Operator

The “not equal to” operator (!=) is incredibly useful when you want to check if two values are distinct or not identical. It’s particularly handy in decision-making scenarios and data filtering. Let’s break down its usage with some examples.

Example 1: Basic Comparison

a = 5
b = 7
result = a != b
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, a is assigned the value 5 and b is assigned the value 7. The expression a != b evaluates to True because 5 is indeed not equal to 7.

name1 = "Alice"
name2 = "Bob"
result = name1 != name2
print(result)  # Output: True

Here, name1 is assigned the string “Alice” and name2 is assigned the string “Bob”. Since the strings are not the same, the expression name1 != name2 evaluates to True.

x = True
y = False
result = x != y
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, x is assigned the value True and y is assigned the value False. The expression x != y evaluates to True because True is not equal to False.

Making Informed Decisions

The “not equal to” operator is often used in if statements and other decision-making scenarios. It enables you to execute specific code blocks only when values are different.

Example with if Statement:

user_input = input("Enter a color: ")
if user_input != "blue":
    print("Not your favorite color?")
else:
    print("Ah, blue is great!")

Greater Than (>) Operator

The greater than operator (>) is one of the fundamental comparison operators in Python that allows you to compare two values and determine whether the first value is greater than the second value. This operator is essential for making decisions and controlling the flow of your program based on the relationships between numerical values. In this explanation, we’ll take a closer look at the greater-than operator, its functionality, and how to use it effectively.

Understanding the Greater Than Operator

The greater than operator (>) is used to compare two values, typically numeric, and determine if the value on the left side is greater than the value on the right side. If the comparison is true, the operator returns True; otherwise, it returns False.

Syntax:

value1 > value2

Examples :

x = 10
y = 5
result = x > y
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, the greater than operator compares x and y. Since x is indeed greater than y, the comparison evaluates to True, and the result is printed as True.

Using the Greater Than Operator

The greater than operator is versatile and can be used with various numeric data types, including integers, floating-point numbers, and more. It’s commonly employed in decision-making scenarios, such as conditional statements and loops, where you want to execute different code blocks based on the comparison result.

Example with if Statement:

user_age = 18
legal_age = 21

if user_age > legal_age:
    print("You are allowed to enter the club.")
else:
    print("Sorry, you must be at least 21 years old.")

In this example, the greater than operator compares user_age and legal_age. If the user’s age is greater than the legal age, the program prints a message allowing entry to the club; otherwise, it prints a message stating the age requirement.

Less Than (<) Operator

Less Than Operator in Python: Explained with Detailed Examples

The less than operator (<) is one of the fundamental comparison operators in Python. It allows us to compare two values and determine whether the left operand is numerically smaller than the right operand. In this explanation, we’ll delve into the difficulties of the less than operator, providing clear examples to help you learn its usage.

Understanding the Less Than Operator

The less than operator (<) is used to compare two values, often numbers, and assess whether the value on the left is smaller than the value on the right. If the condition is met, the operator returns True; otherwise, it returns False.

Examples of the Less Than Operator

Let’s explore various scenarios using the less-than-operator to gain a comprehensive understanding.

Numeric Comparison:

x = 5
y = 8
result = x < y
print(result)  # Output: True (because 5 is less than 8)
temperature = 25
maximum_temperature = 30
is_cooler = temperature < maximum_temperature
print(is_cooler)  # Output: True (temperature is less than maximum_temperature)

String Length Comparison:

word1 = "apple"
word2 = "banana"
is_shorter = len(word1) < len(word2)
print(is_shorter)  # Output: True (apple has fewer letters than banana)

Floating-Point Comparison

float1 = 3.14
float2 = 4.21
is_smaller = float1 < float2
print(is_smaller)  # Output: True (3.14 is less than 4.21)

Using the Less Than Operator with Conditional Statements:

The less than operator is frequently used in conditional statements to make decisions based on comparisons. For instance:

user_age = 17
legal_driving_age = 18

if user_age < legal_driving_age:
    print("You are not eligible to drive yet.")
else:
    print("You can legally drive.")

Greater Than or Equal To Operator (>=)

In Python, the greater than or equal to operator (>=) is a comparison operator that helps you evaluate whether one value is greater than or equal to another value. This operator is part of a set of comparison operators that allow you to make decisions and comparisons based on the relationships between values. Let’s delve into the details of the greater than or equal to operator with clear explanations and relatable examples.

Understanding the Greater Than or Equal To Operator

The greater than or equal to operator (>=) is used to compare two values and determine whether the first value is greater than or equal to the second value. The operator returns True if the comparison is true, indicating that the first value is indeed greater than or equal to the second value. If the comparison is false, the operator returns False.

Using the Greater Than or Equal To Operator with Examples

Let’s explore how the greater than or equal to operator works through straightforward examples:

1. Numeric Values:

x = 10
y = 5
result = x >= y
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, the value of x is 10, and the value of y is 5. The greater than or equal to operator checks whether x is greater than or equal to y. Since 10 is indeed greater than 5, the result is True.

2. Floating-Point Values:

a = 7.5
b = 7.5
result = a >= b
print(result)  # Output: True

3. Combining with Other Operators:

m = 15
n = 10
result = m + n >= 25
print(result)  # Output: True

In this case, the greater than or equal to operator is combined with the addition operator. The expression m + n equals 25, and the operator checks if the result is greater than or equal to 25, which it is. Thus, the result is True.

Using the Greater Than or Equal To Operator in Decision-Making

The greater than or equal to operator is often used in scenarios where you need to make decisions based on values. You can use it in conditional statements (if, elif, else) or loops to control the flow of your program.

Example with if Statement:

age = 18
legal_age = 21

if age >= legal_age:
    print("You are allowed to enter the club.")
else:
    print("Sorry, you must be at least 21 years old to enter.")

Less Than or Equal To (<=)

The less than or equal to operator (<=) is one of the comparison operators in Python. It allows you to compare two values and determine whether the left operand is less than or equal to the right operand. This operator returns a boolean value (True or False) based on the result of the comparison. In this explanation, we’ll delve into the details of the <= operator with simple and illustrative examples.

Understanding the <= Operator

The <= operator is used to compare two values and assess whether the left value is less than or equal to the right value. If the condition is met, the operator returns; otherwise, it returns False. This operator is particularly useful when you want to check if one value is smaller than or equal to another value in various scenarios.

Example Usages of the <= Operator

Let’s explore some examples to better understand how the <= operator works:

1. Numeric Comparison:

x = 5
y = 8
result = x <= y
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, the value of x is 5, and the value of y is 8. The x value is indeed less than y, so the result of the comparison is True.

2. String Comparison:

string1 = "apple"
string2 = "banana"
result = string1 <= string2
print(result)  # Output: True

When comparing strings using the <= operator, Python considers the lexicographical order. Since “apple” comes before “banana” in lexicographical order, the comparison yields True.

3. List Length Comparison:

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list2 = [1, 2, 3, 4]
result = len(list1) <= len(list2)
print(result)  # Output: True

In this example, the length of list1 is 3, and the length of list2 is 4. Since 3 is indeed less than or equal to 4, the comparison evaluates to True.

4. Mixing Data Types:

number = 7
word = "eight"
result = number <= word
print(result)  # Output: False

Conclusion

Comparison operators in Python are vital tools for making decisions and comparisons in Python programming. By understanding these operators and practising with real-world examples, you’ll be prepared to create dynamic and responsive code that reacts to different situations based on the values you’re working with. With this knowledge, you’ll be well on your way to becoming a confident Python programmer.

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